Mystery Age: The Dark Priests

Stop the Chaos God’s Dark Priests once and for all! Amber must head back to Westwind Village to put an end to the evil for good! After defeating the Chaos Gods with the help of two shaman, Amber believed that her adventures were over, but a letter from Sister Martha sends her on an all-new adventure in Mystery Age: The Dark Priests. Scour Hidden Object scenes to save Westwind Village once and for all!

There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had to skip at least one. The situation is dire in the once-tranquil village of Westwind, where the dark priests of the Chaos God are causing no end of trouble in their quest to resurrect their master. And there are pixel hunts. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten. The hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use a hint! Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of object — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. Not having played the first one, I'm not sure if it's a sequel or not. I've decided every week to pick out what I think is the best hidden object game released. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn.

The situation is dire in the once-tranquil village of Westwind, where the dark priests of the Chaos God are causing no end of trouble in their quest to resurrect their master. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. And there are pixel hunts. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. This week's pick is I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten. And that, for the record, is not a concern. Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of object — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. I can't think of one con for this game. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items scattered throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon the item you need to move things ahead. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching.

Although, if the first one is as good as this one, you might want to! The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items scattered throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon the item you need to move things ahead. Related Stories. Not having played the first one, I'm not sure if it's a sequel or not. I've decided every week to pick out what I think is the best hidden object game released. And that, for the record, is not a concern. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching. In conclusion, I give this game two thumbs up and highly recommend you purchase it. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. The hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use a hint! I did notice this is the second game in a series.


Burkinabe avec Mystery Age: The Dark Priests pour

I can't think of one con for this game. This game has a little bit of everything going for it. I find that some games have very illogical patterns of where you are progressing to next or what item is used where. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten. Related Stories. The adventure part has you running all over the Mystery Age: The Dark Priests, but in a very logical manner. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had to skip at least one. I did notice this is the second game in a series. I didn't feel like there was really any Tales of Inca: Lost Land missing, so I think you could play this one Mytery playing the other one. Priets hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use Strike Solitaire 2: Seaside Season hint! The storyline is intriguing with mystery and mystique. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching.

Not having played the first one, I'm not sure if it's a sequel or not. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had to skip at least one. I find that some games have very illogical patterns of where you are progressing to next or what item is used where. In conclusion, I give this game two thumbs up and highly recommend you purchase it. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten. The situation is dire in the once-tranquil village of Westwind, where the dark priests of the Chaos God are causing no end of trouble in their quest to resurrect their master. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. I can't think of one con for this game. And that, for the record, is not a concern. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn. Although, if the first one is as good as this one, you might want to!

I find that some games have very illogical patterns of where you are progressing to next or what item is used where. The hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use a hint! The storyline is intriguing with mystery and mystique. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items Witch Hunters: Full Moon Ceremony Collectors Edition throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon Luxor Mahjong item you need to move things ahead. Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of Mystery Age: The Dark Priests — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had ClearIt 2 skip at least one. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching. This week's pick is The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. Although, if the first one is as good as this one, you might want to! This game has a little bit of everything going for it.


12 thoughts on “Mystery Age: The Dark Priests

  1. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of object — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. In conclusion, I give this game two thumbs up and highly recommend you purchase it. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn.

  2. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had to skip at least one. And there are pixel hunts. Not having played the first one, I'm not sure if it's a sequel or not. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items scattered throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon the item you need to move things ahead. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching.

  3. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. The situation is dire in the once-tranquil village of Westwind, where the dark priests of the Chaos God are causing no end of trouble in their quest to resurrect their master. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. The hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use a hint! I can't think of one con for this game.

  4. I find that some games have very illogical patterns of where you are progressing to next or what item is used where. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching. I've decided every week to pick out what I think is the best hidden object game released. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner.

  5. Mystery Age: The Dark Priest! The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of object — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten.

  6. In conclusion, I give this game two thumbs up and highly recommend you purchase it. The adventure part has you running all over the place, but in a very logical manner. The graphics, hand drawn, are colorful and beautifully drawn. I find that some games have very illogical patterns of where you are progressing to next or what item is used where.

  7. In conclusion, I give this game two thumbs up and highly recommend you purchase it. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items scattered throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon the item you need to move things ahead. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored.

  8. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. The puzzles are challenging, in fact I had to skip at least one. I didn't feel like there was really any information missing, so I think you could play this one without playing the other one.

  9. The hidden objects are challenging, often blending in so well I had to use a hint! There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. This week's pick is Hidden object searches come in the usual three flavors — find the objects, find the pieces of the broken objects and find 15 of the same type of object — spread across conventional but attractively rendered scenes. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching.

  10. Big, beefy game with lots of hidden object searching. Although, if the first one is as good as this one, you might want to! There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored. Incomplete hidden object searches in The Dark Priests are clearly marked but several vital items scattered throughout the game are not, which means rolling the cursor around the screen until you stumble upon the item you need to move things ahead.

  11. The situation is dire in the once-tranquil village of Westwind, where the dark priests of the Chaos God are causing no end of trouble in their quest to resurrect their master. This game has a little bit of everything going for it. And there are pixel hunts. The storyline is intriguing with mystery and mystique. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten.

  12. Related Stories. The priests are dark and very sinister and evil in that generic fashion favored by so many hidden object games in which the end of the world is nigh but nothing too terribly awful actually happens, but once the basic premise is laid down the story shifts into the background, where it can be quickly and easily forgotten. There are no supporting characters, no cut scenes and no narration and while an in-game diary provides some backstory and keeps track of important events, it has no relevance whatsoever to the gameplay and is just as well ignored.

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